Ivar the boneless or Ivar ragnarson

Ivar the boneless or Ivar ragnarson

Ivar  was a leading Viking who had conquered England. He was the eldest son of Ragnar Loðbrok and his wife Aslaug, according to Ragnar Lodbrok’s Tale.[2] Björn Ironside, Halfdan Ragnarsson, Hvitserk, Sigurd Snake-in-the-Eye and Ubba were among his siblings.

The nickname’s origin is not certain. Ívarr beinlausi”Ívarr beinlausi”Ivar legless,”Ivar legless”beinlausi”beinlausi”boneless,”boneless”bone”bone”leg”leg”ben.”ben”Bonelessness”Bonelessness”

 

Ivar’s bonelessness was the product of a spell, according to the Tale of Ragnar Lodbrok. Aslaug, his mother, was Ragnar’s third wife. She was identified as a totva, a form of clairvoyant or seer. She said she and her husband had to wait three nights after his return after a long separation before finishing their marriage (while he was in England raiding). After such a long separation, however, Ragnar was overwhelmed with lust and did not heed her terms. Ivar was born with poor bones.

Ivar’s bonelessness was the product of a spell, according to the Tale of Ragnar Lodbrok. Aslaug, his mother, was Ragnar’s third wife. She was identified as a totva, a form of clairvoyant or seer. She said she and her husband had to wait three nights after his return after a long separation before finishing their marriage (while he was in England raiding). After such a long separation, however, Ragnar was overwhelmed with lust and did not heed her terms. Ivar was born with poor bones as a result .[4]

 

Another assumption is that he was simply regarded as “the Hated” which would be Exosus in Latin. It could easily have been translated by a mediaeval scribe with only basic knowledge of Latin as ex (without) os (bone), thus “the Boneless”[5], although this theory is difficult to reconcile with the direct translation of his name provided in Norse sources.

DEATH OF IVAR THE BONELESS

His death is recorded by the Anglo-Saxon Chronicler Thelweard as 870. The Annals of Ulster identify Ívar’s death in 873. Ívar’s death is also recorded in the Fragmentary Annals of Ireland in the year 873.

 

A copyist in the 17th century added the identification of the king of Laithlind as Gothfraid (i.e., Ímar’s father). The author of the entry was simply named Righ Lochlann (‘the king of Lochlainn’) in the original 11th-century manuscript, which more than likely referred to Ímar, whose death is not otherwise noted in the Fragmentary Annals. The cause of death, a sudden and terrible illness, is not mentioned in any other source, but it raises the likelihood that at the end of his life the true root of Ivar’s Old Norse nickname lies in the debilitating effects of an unexplained illness that struck him down.

According to the saga, Ivar ordered that he be buried in a position that had been subjected to attacks, and prophesied that, if that were achieved, it would be a bad success for enemies coming to the territory. “when Vilhjalm bastard (William I of England) came ashore[,] he went [to the burial site] and broke Ivar’s mound and saw that [Ivar’s] body had not decayed. Then Vilhjalm had a large pyre made upon which Ivar’s body was] burned… Thereupon, [Vilhjalm proceeded with the landing invasion and achieved] the victory.”when Vilhjalm Bastard (William I of England) came ashore[,] he went [to the burial site] and broke the mound of Ivar and saw that the body [of Ivar] had not decayed. Then Vilhjalm had a large pyre made on which the body of Ivar was] burned… Then [Vilhjalm proceeded with the landing invasion and achieved] the victory.

CONCLUSION :

While the sagas describe the physical disability of Ivar, they also stress his inIvartelligence, cunning, and mastery of war strategy and tactics.

He is also considered similar to Ímar, the founder of the Uí Ímair dynasty, which ruled Northumbria from the city of York at different times, from the mid-ninth to the 10th centuries, and controlled the area of the Irish Sea as the Kingdom of Dublin.

 

Also read :  JOSEON DYANSTY EXPLAIND 

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